Category: Writing a Mystery (page 2 of 2)

#Suspense Author J.A. Jance: How A Brush With A Killer Launched Her Career

New York Times Bestselling suspense author J.A. Jance was in town this week signing her most recent book, Downfall: A Brady Novel of Suspense.

Judy Jance is an incredible storyteller. During her presentation she told some remarkable and emotionally-charged stories about events from her own life. She admits one particularly intense event was pivotal because it launched her career as a mystery/suspense writer.

One day in 1970, Jance’s husband was hitchhiking and accepted a ride from a man in a green car. She and her husband lived well outside of town in an isolated area, so her husband wasn’t suspicious when the man asked if his wife was often home alone. Her husband explained that they had dogs.

Within the next few days, Jance learned that there had been a brutal rape and murder nearby. The victim’s friend had spotted a green car at the scene. Putting two-and-two together, she and her husband contacted the police. They learned the man was a serial killer who had killed two other people on the twenty-second day of each month at 2:20 p.m. After realizing the man was dangerous and knew she was often home alone, Judy Jance began carrying a gun. It might have been a wise precaution because when the man was arrested on the 2oth day of the following month, Jance learned that he had intended to make her his next victim on the 22nd!

As one might expect, Judy Jance admitted that the experience changed her. It led her to write her first book, which was a fictionalized account of what happened. Although she found an agent and revised the book, she never sold it. She reported, however, that her second novel sold relatively quickly. It was solidly fiction.

Many things can be taken from this story. First of all, if the detective had taken a few more days to track down the killer, the world might not have J.A. Jance books. On the other hand, if the killer had never existed, she might not have been inspired to write, and if she had chosen to write, she likely would have written something besides police procedurals. Going deeper, you might conclude stories based on true events don’t always make good fiction, no matter how good the writer is.

Beginning writers may find comfort in the fact even bestselling authors may have a “trunk novel” that didn’t sell. Probably Jance’s best advice was that she didn’t fire her agent when her first book didn’t sell, but “fired the book” instead. She still has the same agent, one who has fully supported her career as a bestselling author. What a story!

What do you think?

(By the way, I’m not revealing anything that isn’t already in print. You can read a more about J.A. Jance in an article in the East Valley Tribune from 2004.)

Related posts:

WhoDunIt Challenge with J.A. Jance

Jance interview with Mark David Garrison

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Laura Gibson: Music to Write By

Do you listen to music when you are writing?

I don’t listen when I’m actually writing, but I do look for music to get me into a certain mood or to motivate me before I start for the day.

Laura Gibson (no relation) is not only a singer-songwriter, but also recently completed her MFA in creative writing. Maybe that’s why this song is so inspiring.

 

 

In case you aren’t familiar, the Empire Builder is a train route from Chicago to the Pacific Northwest.

Some of the lines are haunting. I like that you can see the lyrics so you don’t have to guess the words.

What line(s) do you like best? What kind of music inspires you to write?

foggy-road-writing-prompt

Related:

Pitchfork has more information about Laura Gibson’s Empire Builder album and a review.

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Capitalizing Names of Dog Breeds

At a recent writing group meeting, we had a discussion about how to properly capitalize the names of dog breeds. Because there was no consensus. I thought it might be worth doing some research.

belgian-malinois

 (Photograph of Belgian Malinois by GBokas via VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-SA)

Looking at various dog breeder websites, there is no consistency as to how dog breed names are capitalized. Apparently no rules apply.

I decided to go to a grammar expert instead. According to Grammar Girl, the parts of the names derived from proper nouns are capitalized and those from common nouns are not. To be sure, she suggests checking a dictionary.

Examples:

For the German shepherd dog breed, German is capitalized because it is a proper noun (Germany) and shepherd is not because it is a common noun. Dictionary.com agrees with this pattern of capitalization.

Using this model, a standard poodle is not capitalized, but the proper noun in Labrador retriever would be capitalized. Cross those two breeds, however, and the resulting labradoodle is not capitalized (Oxford concurs).

The dog breed that started the discussion was a Belgian Malinois, which is a type of working dog currently favored by law enforcement. Obviously Belgian is a proper noun, but what is Malinois? It turns out Malinois is also a proper name. It is derived from Malines, the French name for the city where the breed originated. Thus, both parts of the name should be capitalized.

Here’s how to pronounce Malinois:

 

In conclusion, whether you are writing about a beagle or an Irish setter a little research will keep you out of the dog house.

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Untangling The Genre Labels: #Mystery #Thriller #Suspense

A few weeks ago I shared the premise of my “mystery” work in progress with a published mystery author and she said it wouldn’t work. She gave me the following reasons:  There has to be a dead body in the first few pages, the female main character needs to be an expert from the beginning (my character learns her trade and grows throughout the story), a female main character couldn’t learn from an older male character who is her mentor (which would make her look weak, plus is sexist), and to never, never, never have characters who get or are married (which my characters are likely to do at some point). She suggested I shelve the project.

I was devastated. I put aside my manuscript and started working on another book. The stoppage lasted for about a week, until I started to question what she told me. What about Precious Ramotswe, the main character in Alexander McCall Smith’s hugely popular No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, who rarely encounters a dead body, learns as she goes, and gets married to Mr. J. L. B. Matekoni?  Or how about the protagonist in Dorothy Gilman’s Mrs. Pollifax series? She doesn’t fit the mystery detective stereotype. Then it struck me. What if the problem wasn’t the product, but the label?

MysteryThrillerSuspense

The Labels:  Mystery, Suspense and Thriller

The dividing lines between mystery, suspense, and thriller genres can be blurry because:

  • The terms have been used interchangeably in the past.
  • They have been defined differently by various agents and publishers.
  • The definitions are made more confusing by popular novels that cross the boundaries into two or more genres.

Regardless, having a clear genre in mind will help you write and sell your work.

Mystery
Usually the protagonist stumbles on a murder or other serious crime early in the book and struggles to find out the truth about it. The level of danger/action is moderate. The identity of the culprit is the main secret.

Suspense
The crime or murder hasn’t taken place in the beginning of the story and the reader may know more about it than the protagonist. Tension arises from wondering whether the characters will be able to stop bad things from happening. In suspense, the identity of the culprit is usually known. It is not a secret or surprise.

Thriller
Danger and tension are the key words in a thriller. Packed with action, the protagonist and other characters are usually under threat from the beginning and the levels escalate. Some people consider thrillers to be a branch of suspense, or basically suspense on steroids.

Based on these definitions, the best label for my work in progress is suspense. Looking deeper, it turns out there are many sub-genres of suspense.

Some Sub-genres of Suspense

Romantic Suspense
Vastly different novels have been labelled as “romantic suspense,” from the Sisterhood series by Fern Michaels  to Shelley Coriell’s dark, twisty The Apostles series, to Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series. The common thread is that relationships pop up between characters and prove to be an essential part of the plot.

Domestic or Relationship Suspense
Domestic suspense novels feature crimes revolving around family members. Although examples have been around for awhile, it has recently been gaining in popularity as more readers discover it. Depending on the level of action/danger, this sub-genre may be called a family thriller. Also related is the malice domestic mystery, which involves solving a crime against a family member.

Personal Jeopardy
In this sub-genre an ordinary person goes up against a powerful enemy. Will they be able to prevail? Sometimes if the persons in jeopardy are family members, this may overlap with domestic suspense.

Paranormal/Supernatural Suspense
This is a suspense novel with supernatural or paranormal elements.

Bickering Team or Cohort
Two friends, acquaintances, or a married couple work together to prevent bad things from happening. The less-than-smooth relationship between the two adds to the interest/tension in the story.

Of course, there are more sub-genres of suspense and even more thriller sub-genres. Hopefully, knowing that the different types exist will free you to explore the story you want to tell.

What are your thoughts about these categories? Do you think they are helpful or lead to formulaic fiction?

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If you’d like to learn more about mysteries, thrillers, and suspense, try Carolyn Wheat’s How to Write Killer Fiction

Disclosure: I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

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Awesome Advice from Mesa Writer in Residence @ShonnaSlayton #amwriting

Arizona writers are incredibly lucky this year because our libraries are offering Writer in Residence programs with local published authors. Author Shonna Slayton is the current Writer in Residence at the Mesa Public Library and she gave me some excellent advice this week. I’d like to share the highlights.

Writing Advice 1. Set a Deadline.

When you participate in NaNoWriMo or have a book publisher hounding you for a book, deadlines are obvious. When you just finished your first draft and are slogged down in revisions, you can find reasons to put them off forever. Setting a deadline, no matter how arbitrary, means you will keep making progress toward your goal.

Deadline:  I hope to finish the revisions on my current work in progress by the end of October so I can start NaNoWriMo in November with a fresh new project.

Writing Advice 2. Analyze bestselling books in your genre for plotting, etc.

Shonna Slayton suggested StoryFix 2.0 by Larry Brooks as a good place to get started. Once you reach the website, scroll down to the categories section in the left sidebar. There you will find what he calls “deconstructions” of best-selling novels and movies. Take a look to learn how to do it yourself.

Note: although these deconstructions are more for plotters (those who outline) than pantsers (those who write by the seat of their pants), they can be helpful for pantsers who need to make revisions, too.

Personal advice:

She also gave me some helpful personal advice. First, she suggested I shutter some of my many, many blogs. She said we only have a limited amount of time to complete our projects and if we want to accomplish the big ones, sometimes we have to let some of the distractions/little things go.  Following her advice, today I shut down my children’s book review blog, Wrapped in Foil. One distraction gone.

Secondly, she helped me sort out a problem I was having about when to start the narrative of my book. I had started at the point where my main character met her mentor, but it wasn’t clear who the main character was because the story is told from both points of view. I had considered starting later in the story when the main character is stronger, leaving their meeting as backstory. What I had not considered, and what she suggested, was starting earlier at the point where the main character had a crisis that sent her on the path to meet the mentor. Success! I’m now writing passionately again after two weeks of painful limbo.

Hopefully some of Shonna Slayton’s advice will help you move forward with your writing project.

And, be sure to check out Shonna Slayton’s YA books for an enjoyable mix of fantasy and historical fiction.

Cinderella’s Dress

Cinderella’s Shoes

And coming soon, Spindle

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@ShelleyCoriell’s The Apostles Series: The Buried

Today we are continuing with Shelley Coriell’s romantic suspense series The Apostles. The second book, The Buried, FBI Agent Theodore “Hatch” Hatcher and his state prosecutor ex-wife, Grace Courtemanche race to find a serial killer who buries victims alive.

(Affiliate link to Amazon)

As a member of The Apostles, Hatch Hatcher specializes in crisis negotiations. His office is a sailboat where he retreats between jobs, ready to respond to a call on his satellite phone at a moments notice. When the call comes to tell him he has a son he didn’t know about, things start to tumble out of control. Running into his ex-wife who is chasing a serial killer further complicates matters. Can the two of them put their personal feelings aside long enough to catch the killer?

Because each book in The Apostles series features a different set of characters, they could be read as stand alone titles or in any order. In The Buried the romance side is less steamy and more of a slow burn than in book one. Once again, the suspense side is dark, complicated, and the author throws in a whopper of a plot twist at the end.

As with The Broken, the setting helps add to the atmosphere of the book. The Buried is set in Cypress Grove, a town in the Florida panhandle. The background oozes swamps and alligators, adding to the suspense.

At the workshop I attended, Shelley disclosed that she actually put off working on this novel for two years. It wasn’t until she added a teenage character did she find the right mix to move the plot forward. I would say the teenager was a brilliant touch because he adds backstory and conflict in a way that ignites Hatch as a character. She also revealed it was difficult to write about the killer, who has a complicated and painful/sad backstory. She talks more about writing the book on GoodReads.

This title won’t remain “buried” in your TBR pile. The Buried is a compelling story that will keep you hooked to the very end.

Related:  Review of The Broken by Shelley Coriell

Series: The Apostles (Book 2)
Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Forever (October 28, 2014)
ISBN-10: 145552851X
ISBN-13: 978-1455528516

 

egret-florida-white-bird-wildlife-nature-wild
(Public domain photo via Visual hunt)

This review is based on my personal copy of the book.

#Amwriting #Mystery: 5 Tips For Making Revisions Less Painful

You’ve blasted out the first draft draft of your novel and have patted yourself on the back for a job well done. But is it done? Looming large is the abyss known as revisions.

painless-revisions

 

 

Here are five tips for getting the most out of revisions as painlessly as possible.

  1. Get fresh eyes on your project.

Although writing a novel is perceived as a solo enterprise, realistically you should have a support network of experts and fellow writers to give you feedback and make your novel shine. Look for reading and writing groups through libraries, bookstores, writing societies, and online networks like Meetup. Friends and family may be convenient readers, but ask them for help only if they have the expertise to make your writing better.

If you are the type of writer who slaves over every word, critiques can be difficult at first. Remember that you don’t have to make every change, but if you are open to suggestions, people will be more willing to offer their honest opinions in the future. Provide paper copies, if possible, so less vocal readers can mark your work with comments to be read in private.

Another benefit of participating in a writing group is that you get experience reading your work in front of an audience.

2.   Make sure each chapter ends with some tension.

Imagine your reader is comfortable in bed reading your book. Your reader says, “I’ll just read to the end of this chapter and then I’ll turn out the light.” If you ramp up the tension or suspense at the end of the chapter, you will entice your reader to move on to see what happens. Sometimes leaving a question unanswered is enough to get the pages turning.

Now you have your draft finished, turn to the end of each chapter and ask yourself, “Would I turn the page or turn off the light?”

3. Attack your personal writing imperfections with the “Find” function

Once you start having others critique your work, you may find you have quirks or issues that pop up again and again in your writing. For example, in my case I use “I think,” “He decided,”  and other thought verbs too often.

What I write:  I think I’ll go to the store. She decided to go to the store.

Much stronger:  I went to the store. She ran to the store.

If you are like me, the thought verbs are so ingrained I don’t even notice them when I read my work. To get brutal during revisions I used the “find” editing tool and looked for every “think” and “decided.”

Another writing trap is to use the same descriptions again and again. “She shrugged, he nodded, he wrinkled his nose.” Use “find” to get an idea how often you use a given phrase and decide if you need to generate some fresh ones.

Once you locate the offending words, rewrite the sentences to make them stronger. Do this again on the finished draft to make sure your personal quirks haven’t slipped back in.

4. Walk through your characters’ world to strengthen descriptions

I recently had the opportunity to meet with a wonderful writer who shared his techniques for making his scene descriptions specific and clear. Rather than simply visualizing events in his head, he actually stood up and acted them out.

For example, character A meets character B, who is much younger and has her eyes on her cell phone. How does character A get character B’s attention? The written description of the actions became more realistic with a little play acting. Enlist friends and family to play charades with some of your trickier scenes and see how they work.

5. Have your computer read your novel to you.

As a final step, if your software has a speaking or reading function, have your computer read your work to you as you silently read the text, preferably from a paper copy. The computer will have a measured pace, which allows you to find double words, words that were left out, spacing issues and all sorts of other flaws that are easy for you to overlook while reading silently.

The revision process is a necessary step for making your novel the best it can be. Hopefully these tips will help.

Do you have any tips to make revising easier? If your choose, please share them.

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Answer to Whodunit Challenge 3: Raymond Chandler #Mystery Author

Our Whodunit challenge author from last week was Raymond Chandler (video in the link has a short bio).

The teacher in a writing class I once took said what we write first is usually a cliché. The trick is to recognize we go to the familiar first and push ourselves to create something new and fresh. This is particularly true of descriptions.

Raymond Chandler was the king of the witty and fresh description. For example in Farewell, My Lovely instead of writing the antagonist had big hands, he wrote the guy had “a hand I could have sat in…”  What a memorable image.

One of my personal favorites is found in the beginning of The Big Sleep.

 

(This post contains affiliate links to Amazon)

“Over the entrance doors…there was a broad stained-glass panel showing a knight in dark armor rescuing a lady who was tied to a tree  and didn’t have any clothes on but some very long and convenient hair. The knight had pushed the vizor of his helmet back to be sociable, and he was fiddling with the knots on the ropes that tied the lady to the tree and not getting anywhere. I stood there and thought that if I lived in the house, I would sooner or later have to climb up there and help him. He didn’t seem to be really trying.”

Not only does he give action to an inanimate object, he reveals much about his famous private detective Philip Marlowe’s character right up front. Here is a man who both is observant and likes to get things done.

Besides, how can you not like an author who has his photograph taken with his cat?

RayChandlerCat

(Photograph found on various websites without proper credit. If you have more information, please let me know.)

 

If you are a fan of mysteries, there are some excellent collections of Raymond Chandler’s work still available.

Raymond Chandler: Stories and Early Novels: Pulp Stories / The Big Sleep / Farewell, My Lovely / The High Window

 

Raymond Chandler: Later Novels and Other Writings: The Lady in the Lake / The Little Sister / The Long Goodbye / Playback /Double Indemnity / Selected Essays and Letters

 

Stop back next week for a new Whodunit challenge. Please leave a comment if you have suggestions for future authors.

Are you a fan of Raymond Chandler’s mysteries? Which one is your favorite?

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#amwriting #mystery: Why There Are Holes In My Plot

Writing a mystery novel can be difficult under the best of circumstances, but today was a particular strain. You see, I organized a bunch of notes detailing my plot last night longhand on a poster-sized piece of paper. It didn’t help my writing, however, because now I can’t read it.

 

writing-helper-cat-223

Yes, there’s going to be a cat-shaped hole in the plot.

Have you ever had difficulties plotting like this?

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How to Write a Great #Mystery (From NPR)

Interested in writing or reading mysteries? You might want listen to an interview from Talk of the Nation (NPR) with Tana French, author of In The Woods and The Likeness,

and Louis Bayard, author of Mr. Timothy and The Pale Blue Eye.

I love Tana French’s statement about how crime novels are a barometer of society.

You can find a transcript at the NPR website.

What part of the interview resonated with you?

microphone

Photo via Visualhunt.com

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